Wednesday, 27 March 2019

SHLOYME KIVIN


SHLOYME KIVIN (b. June 12, 1886)
            He was born Shloyme-Khayim Kapelushnik in the town of Tsheray (Chereya), Mogilev Province, Byelorussia, into a Hassidic family.  He studied in religious elementary school, later graduating from a high school in Vitebsk as an external student.  From his youth he was involved in the revolutionary movement, later becoming one of the leading forces in Labor Zionism, especially its left wing, in Russia.  In late 1915 he settled in Moscow.  His journalistic work concentrated on Party theoretical issues.  He wrote for Dos yudishe arbayter vort (The Jewish worker’s word) (1906) and edited the collections (1911-1912) Di tsayt (The times), Der gedank (The idea), and Unzer tsayt (Our time).  After the revolution, he was the editor of the journal: Der proletarisher gedank (The proletarian idea) (Kiev-Moscow, 1920-1927), organ of Labor Zionist party, which also appeared in Russian (1919-1926).  Its last issue (no. 49-50) appeared in December 1927 and was dedicated to the ten-year jubilee of the October Revolution.  He published the pamphlet: Der arbeter-klas un di arbeter-bavegung in palestine (The working class and the labor movement in Palestine), unseen; and several works on Party history in Russian.  He was arrested in 1938 and died in a Soviet camp.  His pen names include: S. A., A. A. N. D., and Solomon.

Sources: Zalmen Reyzen, Leksikon, vol. 3; Chone Shmeruk, comp., Pirsumim yehudiim babrit-hamoatsot, 1917-1961 (Jewish publications in the Soviet Union, 1917-1961) (Jerusalem, 1961), see index; Zeev Blum, “Poyle-tsien” in ratnfarband, zikhroynes, gedanken un dokumentn (The labor Zionists in the Soviet Union, memoirs, ideas, and documents) (Tel Aviv, 1978), pp. 6, 16, 20ff.
Berl Cohen

[Additional information from: Berl Kagan, comp., Leksikon fun yidish-shraybers (Biographical dictionary of Yiddish writers) (New York, 1986), col. 483; Chaim Beider, Leksikon fun yidishe shrayber in ratn-farband (Biographical dictionary of Yiddish writers in the Soviet Union), ed. Boris Sandler and Gennady Estraikh (New York: Congress for Jewish Culture, Inc., 2011), pp. 334-35.]


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