Friday, 22 June 2018

KREYNE EKSHTEYN


KREYNE EKSHTEYN
            She was born in the town of Kuznitse (Kurenets), near Grodno, Poland.  Her father was the rabbi there.  With Avrom Zak and Leyb Neydus, she published a Yiddish journal in Grodno, called Der nyeman (The Neman [River]).  Other details remain unknown.

Source: Grodner opklangen (Buenos Aires) 3-4 (1949/1950), pp. 50-51.


MOYSHE ELSHTEYN


MOYSHE ELSHTEYN
            He came from Lodz and worked as a weaver.  He published poetry in Lodz publications and also in the collection Varshever shriftn (Warsaw writings) (1927).  His poems had an impact on Yiddish literary circles in Lodz.  He also a roused a sensation in the Lodz press for his public opposition to the well-known Lodz textile magnate Osher Kohn.  With Nazi Germany’s invasion of Poland, he was in Bialystok.  His subsequent fate remains unknown.

Sources: N. Taykh, in Unzer lodzh (Our Lodz) (Buenos Aires, 1954); Y. Goldkorn, in Zayn (New York) (May 1962); Goldkorn, in Lodzher portretn (Lodz portraits) (Tel Aviv, 1963), pp. 168-73.
Benyomen Elis


MENAKHEM (-MENDL) EKSHTEYN


MENAKHEM (-MENDL) EKSHTEYN (b. 1885)
            He was born in Reyshe (Rzeszów) and lived until the Nazi occupation in Cracow, Galicia.  He studied with the religious writer Rabbi Yikusiel Arye Kalhar.  He completed his doctoral degree in philology and philosophy from Cracow University.  Until WWII he was a teacher at the Agudah’s women’s seminary.  He wrote in both Yiddish and in Hebrew.  From 1926 he was publishing articles on Orthodox education and on Hassidism in light of modern research in: Der idisher veg (The Jewish way) of which he was also co-editor, in Cracow (1926); Dos yudishe togblat (The Jewish daily newspaper), Deglanu (Our banner), and Darkenu (Our path) in Warsaw; and Dos vort in Vilna—among other items, he published here portion of his work, “Vegn tsu der eygener velt” (Paths to one’s own world).  Over the years 1937-1939, he published serially in Beys-yankev zhurnal (Beys-Yankev journal) in Lodz his essay “Psikhologishe elementn in khsides” (Psychological elements in Hassidism)—the announcements indicate that it should have appeared through 1939.  He was killed in the years of the Nazi occupation and rule.

Sources: Biblyografishe yorbikher fun yivo (Bibliographic yearbooks from YIVO) (Warsaw, 1928), see index; Beys-yankev zhurnal (Lodz) 1-2 (1937); information from Yoysef Fridenzon in New York.
Khayim Leyb Fuks


TSVI EKRONI


TSVI EKRONI (b. September 19, 1911)
            The Hebraized name of Tsvi (Hersh) Akerman, he was born in Ploieşti, Bessarabia.  He was secretary of the Zionist Organization in the Belz region of Bessarabia and leader of the Jewish National Fund and of the central committee of pioneers in Bessarabia.  He edited the newspaper Erd un arbet (Land and work) in Kishinev and a member of the editorial board of Frayhayt (Freedom) in Czernowitz and of Unzer tsayt (Our time) in Kishinev.  He published poems and stories in recognized publications and in: Yidisher almanakh groys-rumenyen (Jewish almanac of Great Romania) in Bucharest, Farn idishn kind (For the Jewish child) in Kishinev, and elsewhere.  He made aliya to the land of Israel in 1933.

Source: D. Tidhar, in Entsiklopedyah lealutse hayishuv uvonav (Encyclopedia of the pioneers and builders of the yishuv), vol.11 (Tel Aviv, 1961), pp. 3741-42.
Yankev Kahan


AYZIK-BER EKERMAN


AYZIK-BER EKERMAN
            He was born in a small town in Podlasie.  He received a religious-Hassidic education.  He was a regular contributor to: Dos yidishe togblat (The Jewish daily newspaper), Der id (The Jew), and Yugend bleter (Youth sheets) in Warsaw; Unzer veg (Our way) in Siedlce; Beys yankev zhurnal (Beys-Yankev journal) in Lodz; and edited Idishe lebn (Jewish life) in Warsaw.  He served as secretary to the first Orthodox deputies to the Sejm in Poland.  He was killed during WWII by the Germans in the Warsaw Ghetto.

Sources: M. Mozes, in Der poylisher yid, yearbook (1944); Yidishe shriftn, anthology (Lodz, 1946); Z. Segalovitsh, Tlomatske 13, fun farbrente nekhtn (13 Tłomackie St., of zealous nights) (Buenos Aires: Central Association of Polish Jews in Argentina, 1946), p. 154; Dr. Hillel Zaydman, Tog-bukh fun varshever geto (Diary from the Warsaw Ghetto) (Buenos Aires, 1947), pp. 35, 110, 278; M. Turkov, Di letste fun a groysn dor (The last of a great generation) (Buenos Aires, 1954), p. 55; B. Kutsher, Geven amol varshe (As Warsaw once was) (Paris, 1955); M. Prager, in Fun noentn over (New York) 2 (1956), pp. 454, 472; Entsiklopediya shel galuyot (Encyclopedia of the Diaspora), vol. 2 (Warsaw, 1959), pp. 391, 560.
Yankev Kahan


BENYOMEN EKMAN


BENYOMEN EKMAN
            He contributed work to the anthology Af der shvel (At the threshold) which appeared in Warsaw in 1931.  In book form, he published: Der tog fargeyt, lider (The day comes to an end, poetry) (Warsaw, 1937), 31 pp.

Source: Y. Pat, in Vokhnshrift far literatur (Warsaw) (July 17, 1931).
Benyomen Elis


NOSN EK (NATHAN ECK)


NOSN EK (NATHAN ECK) (March 19, 1889-February 22, 1982)
            He was born in Yanov (Janów), near Lemberg, at the time in Austrian Galicia.  Until age thirteen he studied with a Talmud tutor, thereafter at home and later still in a Polish state high school in Lemberg.  Over the years 1915-1918, he served in the Austrian army.  In 1922 he graduated from the University of Vienna with a doctoral degree in law.  In 1929 he graduated from Warsaw University.  His writing activities commenced with an article in Lemberg’s Togblat (Daily newspaper) in 1912.  He was editor (1920-1921) of the daily newspaper Viner morgnpost (Vienna morning mail).  He also edited several issues of Undzer ruf (Our call), a monthly newspaper of Vienna’s Hitadut (Union).  He was the editor and a contributor (1923-1925) to Folk un land (People and land), which initially appeared in Lemberg and later in Lodz and Warsaw.  He placed work in Lodzher togblat (Lodz daily newspaper) for which he wrote editorials and feature pieces, and for the Polish Jewish newspaper Wiadomości Codzienne (Daily news).  He edited and contributed to three volumes of the Hebrew-language annual Teḥumim (Spheres) (1937-1939).  During WWII he was confined in the Warsaw Ghetto, and he took part in cultural activities and economic relief work for the ghetto population.  In 1945 he visited the United States for a short time.  He lived in Paris (1946-1947), served as a member of the editorial board of the Parisian weekly newspaper Unzer vort (Our word), and he wrote at this time an introduction and notes to the first publication of Yitskhok Katsenelson’s Dos lid fun oysgehargetn yidishn folk (The poem of the murdered Jewish people) (Paris, 1945), 80 pp.  From 1948 he was a resident of the state of Israel.  He published articles in: Tog (Day), Idisher kemfer (Jewish fighter), Tsukunft (Future), Hadoar (The mail), and Jewish Social Studies—in New York; and Davar (Word), Haarets (The land), Di goldene keyt (The golden chain) of which he was the first secretary to the editorial board, Dos vort (The word), and Niv hakevutsa (Words of the collective)—in Tel Aviv.  His depictions of the era of the third destruction (Holocaust) received considerable attention in the Jewish world.  He published several volumes in Hebrew, a book of essays on the Holocaust, and two volumes of translation from English.  Among them: Shoat haam hayehudi beeropa (Destruction of the Jewish people in Europe) (Jerusalem: Yad vashem, 1975), 451 pp.  From 1954 he was a contributor and editor of writings in Hebrew, Yiddish, and English for Yediot yad vashem (News from Yad Vashem), Yad vashem (Yad Vashem) with A. L. Kubovi, and Kovets mekarim (Collection of studies).  Among his pen names: Nosn Ekrun, Nosn Klita, and Nosn Ben Meir.  He died in Tel Aviv.



Sources: Yanos Turkov, Azoy iz es geven (That’s how it was) (Buenos Aires, 1948), pp. 66, 205, 230; Khayim Leyb Fuks, in Dun noentn over (New York) 3 (1957); Meylekh Ravitsh, Mayn leksikon (My lexicon), vol. 3 (Montreal, 1958), p. 481; B. Ts., in Haarets (Tel Aviv) (June 3, 1960); D. Ron, Hapoel hatsair (The young worker) (Tel Aviv: 1960); M. Vaykhert, Yidishe aleynhilf, 1939-1945 (Jewish self-help, 1939-1945) (Tel Aviv, 1962), p. 329.
Benyomen Elis

[Additional information from: Berl Kagan, comp., Leksikon fun yidish-shraybers (Biographical dictionary of Yiddish writers) (New York, 1986), col. 419.]