Thursday, 16 August 2018

MOYSHE PRIZAMENT


MOYSHE PRIZAMENT (1859-August 5, 1905)
            He was the father of Yankev and Shloyme Prizament, born in Lutsk, Volhynia.  He received a traditional Jewish education.  When he reached the age of military service, he left for Rava-Ruska in eastern Galicia and became a wedding entertainer and folksinger.  He was well-known under the name “Moyshele Hibener” or “Moyshele Marshalik,” and he was in his day one of the most popular wedding entertainers and folksingers.  He appears to have published Hebrew poetry in Hanesher (The eagle) and Hamevaser (The herald) and Yiddish poems for Rohotin’s newspaper.  He also wrote songs especially for the Broder singers and was a personal friend of Avrom Goldfaden.

Sources: Zalmen Zilbertsvayg, Leksikon fun yidishn teater (Handbook of the Yiddish theater), vol. 3 (New York, 1959), p. 1873; Argentiner yorbukh (Argentinian yearbook) (1954/1955), p. 238.
Benyomen Elis


YANKEV PRIZAMENT


YANKEV PRIZAMENT (May 7, 1885-February 1, 1923)
            The son of Moyshe Prizament, he was born in Hovniv (Uhniv), near Rava-Ruska, Galicia.  Until age sixteen, he studied in yeshiva.  He worked at bookkeeping and at the same time was a professional prompter for Gimpel’s Lemberg Yiddish theater.  There he first play, Gdalye hoyker (Gdalye the hunchback), was staged.  He was also the author of: Sherlok holms (Sherlock Holmes), a comedy; Kapitan dreyfus (Captain Dreyfus), and Der vayser otello (The white Othello), among other plays; and he wrote one-act plays, couplets, and theatrical songs, and published poetry in periodical publications.  He translated for the Yiddish theater: Shakespeare’s Othello, Shaylok (Shylock) [= The Merchant of Venice?], Hamlet, and Makbet (Macbeth), and Schiller’s Di royber (The robbers [original: Die Räuber]).  He left behind an unpublished biblical drama Iev (Job) in verse.  He authored the libretto Shimshn (Samson).  He also left in manuscript a dramatization of Victor Hugo’s Der glokntsyer fun notrdam (The bell ringer of Notre Dame [original Notre-Dame de Paris]).

Source: Zalmen Zilbertsvayg, Leksikon fun yidishn teater (Handbook of the Yiddish theater), vol. 3 (New York, 1959), pp. 1872-73.
Benyomen Elis


Wednesday, 15 August 2018

HADASE PRIVES (HADASA PRYWES)


HADASE PRIVES (HADASA PRYWES)
            She came from Sosnovits (Sosnowiec), Poland.  She was the author of the book, In roykh fun bzhezhinki (In the smoke of Birkenau) (Tel Aviv: Perets Publ., 1966), 264 pp.  The writer was at the time of the war’s outbreak (September 1939) an ordinary, pious Jewish woman and the mother of two children; she describes in her book her personal experiences and the agony of the destruction of Sosnowiec Jewry, from September 1, 1939 until May 1945, in the Środula ghetto [a neighborhood in Sosnowiec] and in the death camps of Auschwitz and Birkenau.  She was last living in the state of Israel.

Source: Mortkhe Hampel, in Idishe tsaytung (Tel Aviv) (September 30, 1966).
Khayim Leyb Fuks


AVROM PRIBLUDE


AVROM PRIBLUDE (April 1, 1900-1978)
            A journalist, ethnographer, and historian, he was born in Balte (Balta), Russia, into the family of a bookbinder.  From early youth, he worked with his father and became a bibliophile.  He studied in religious elementary school, later in a Russian high school.  He graduated from the law and history faculties of Odessa University.  He worked as a teacher of Jewish history.  He later moved over to law and worked in the office of the national minorities in the Odessa municipal court; he translated into Yiddish the criminal and land legal codes.  He later moved to Moscow, where he undertook research into Jewish anthroponymy and the role of Jews in social and political life in Tsarist and Soviet Russia, in the civil war, and in WWII, as well as on Jewish diplomats and state leaders.  From the 1970s, he wrote on these topics in Sovetish heymland (Soviet homeland) in Moscow, Folksshtime (Voice of the people) in Warsaw, and other Yiddish and Russian publications.  His publications include: “Tsu der geshikhte fun yidish familye-nemen” (On the history of Jewish family names), Sovetish heymland 6 (1987).

Sources: Sovetish heymland, Materyaln far a leksikon fun der yidisher sovetisher literatur (Materials for a handbook of Soviet Jewish literature) (September 1975-); M. Grayzer, in Morgn frayhayt (new York) (December 18, 1974).

Berl Kagan, comp., Leksikon fun yidish-shraybers (Biographical dictionary of Yiddish writers) (New York, 1986), col. 435; Chaim Beider, Leksikon fun yidishe shrayber in ratn-farband (Biographical dictionary of Yiddish writers in the Soviet Union), ed. Boris Sandler and Gennady Estraikh (New York: Congress for Jewish Culture, Inc., 2011), pp. 286-87.

LEYB PRIBULSKI


LEYB PRIBULSKI (1884-May 12, 1933)
            He was born in Pinsk, Byelorussia.  He completed his studies to be a doctor at the Universities of Kiev and Berlin.  He studied music at the Berlin Conservatory.  In 1910 he settled in Lodz and practiced medicine there.  He was active in Jewish cultural life, and as a conductor and art critic.  Over the years 1914-1918, he served in the Russian army on the front, and later until his death he again lived in Lodz.  He was a contributor to Lodzher tsageblat (Lodz daily newspaper), in which aside from a series of reportage pieces from the war, he also published “medical chats” and regularly reviewed music.  He also wrote for Hatsfira (The siren) in Warsaw.  He died in Lodz.

Sources: Biblyografishe yorbikher fun yivo (Bibliographic yearbooks from YIVO) (Warsaw, 1928), see index; obituary notices in the Yiddish press in Lodz and Warsaw; Khayim Leyb Fuks, in Fun noentn over (New York) 3 (1957), see index.
Khayim Leyb Fuks


YITSKHOK PRIBULSKI


YITSKHOK PRIBULSKI (ca. 1876-December 10, 1908)
            He was born in Orle, Pinsk region, Byelorussia, into a rabbinical family.  He studied with his father in the synagogue study chamber and later in the Vilna teachers’ seminary.  Over the years 1898-1902, he lived in London, later working as a Hebrew teacher in Kuznitse (Kurenets) and Sukhovolye (Suchowola).  He was an older friend of Perets Hirshbeyn on whom he exerted an influence in his life and writing.  From 1894 he published Yiddish poetry in: Arbeter fraynd (Workers’ friend), Londoner id (London Jew), Romantsaytung (Fiction newspaper), Der telegraf (The telegraph), and Hatsfira (The siren) in Warsaw.  In issues 6, 7, and 8 (1908) of Romantsaytung, he published his drama Kinder (Children) in three acts.  He died in Suchowola.

Sources: Perets Hirshbeyn, Mayn kinder-yorn (My childhood years) (Warsaw, 1932), pp. 228-48, 263-68, 283-85; Perets Hirshbayn, In gang fun lebn (On the path of life) (New York: Tsiko, 1948), pp. 72-76, 170; Zalmen Zilbertsvayg, Leksikon fun yidishn teater (Handbook of the Yiddish theater), vol. 3 (New York, 1959), p. 1871.
Khayim Leyb Fuks


L. PRUSMAN


L. PRUSMAN (b. 1895)
            He was a Soviet Yiddish writer and translator of popular scientific and school books into Yiddish for children and young people.  He was among the first workers on Yiddish publications in Ukraine.  He published in such Soviet organs as: Komunistishe fon (Communist banner), Komunistishe velt (Communist world), and Emes (Truth).  His first published booklet was: A naye parnose (A new living), a story (Kharkov: Pedagogisher Publ., 1919), 16 pp., a pamphlet in the series “Literarishe biblyotek far der yugnt” (Literary library for youth).  He wrote no further works of literature.  From 1924 he was a contributor to the commission that, under the editorship of Yisroel Yakhinson, prepared materials for workers’ schools; and he was the co-author, with M. Maydanski, of Lenins ruf, leyen-bukh far likpinktn (Lenin’s call, a textbook for illiteracy liquidation stations), (Kiev: Kultur-lige, 1925), 74 pp., second and third editions (Kiev, 1928, 1929).  Together with Y. Burtyanski, Y. Grinberg, B. Dvorkin, Y. Yakhinson, and L. Shtshupak, he compiled: Arbet-bukh af naturvisnshaft un gepografye (Workbook for natural science and geography), part 1, for the teacher, guide to methods and techniques, natural science terminology, and a list of literature (Kiev, 1926), 103 pp.; and with the same title, part 2, materials of the industry, weights and measures, construction materials, gasses, heating, fires, temperature measurements, and caloric measurements (Kiev, 1927), 163 pp.  He translated from Russian: Y. B. Ignatiev and S. Lebediev, Bashtimer fun beymer un mistgrozn (Designations of trees and weeds) (Kiev, 1926), 43 pp.; G. A. Dzhalov, Hant-bukh far kornflantsers (Handbook for grain plants), with L. Shtshupak (Kharkov, 1932), 91 pp.; A. Pidgrushina, Vos dertsaylt undz di erd vegn der geshikhte un antviklung fun lebn (What the Earth tells us about the history and development of life) (Kharkov, 1932), 160 pp.; B. Vsesvyatski, Botanik (Botany), a textbook for middle school, school years 5-6 (Kharkov, 1933), 175 pp.; M. Tsoyzmer, Zoologye (Zoology), with Z. Skuditski and L. Shtshupak (Kharkov, 1933), 237 pp., with drawings.  After 1937 there has been no further information about him.

Sources: Kh. F., in Tsukunft (New York) (January 1919); Biblyografishe yorbikher fun yivo (Bibliographic yearbooks from YIVO) (Warsaw, 1928), see index; A. Vilenkin, in Shtern (Kharkov) 276 (1933); N. Rubinshteyn, Dos yidishe bukh in sovetnfarband in 1932 (The Yiddish book in the Soviet Union in 1932) (Minsk, 1933), see index.
Khayim Leyb Fuks

[Additional information from: Berl Kagan, comp., Leksikon fun yidish-shraybers (Biographical dictionary of Yiddish writers) (New York, 1986), col. 434; Chaim Beider, Leksikon fun yidishe shrayber in ratn-farband (Biographical dictionary of Yiddish writers in the Soviet Union), ed. Boris Sandler and Gennady Estraikh (New York: Congress for Jewish Culture, Inc., 2011), p. 286.]