Wednesday, 12 December 2018

REGINA (PERL) FRISHVASER


REGINA (PERL) FRISHVASER (1888-March 30, 1959)
            The wife of Ben Frishvaser, she was born in Austria.  She was an active leader in the Workmen’s Circle and for many years secretary of the managing committee of Forverts (Forward) in New York.  She contributed in the women’s section to Forverts.  She also published a cookbook in English.

Source: Forverts (New York) (April 1, 1959).
Yankev Kahan


BEN FRISHVASER (YEKUSIEL BOREKH)


BEN FRISHVASER (YEKUSIEL BOREKH) (1883-July 30, 1958)
            The husband of Regina (Perl) Frishvaser, he came from Sasov (Sasów), Galicia.  He moved to the United States and became active in the Workmen’s Circle.  For each Workmen’s Circle conference, he published a humorous publication Bezem (Broom), in which he would chide the elite by using humorous cartoons and jokes.  He also edited Der sasover (The Sasover), a six-page publication (two pages in English).  He died in New York.

Sources: Der sasover (New York) 31-32 (1939); Arbeter-ring boyer un tuer (Builders and leaders of the Workmen’s Circle), ed. Y. Yeshurin and Y. Sh. Herts (New York, 1962), p. 322.
Yankev Kahan


YISROEL-ZEV FRISHBERG


YISROEL-ZEV FRISHBERG (May 18, 1874-October 18, 1955)
            He was born in Druzhne, Podolia.  He studied in religious elementary school and synagogue study hall, and secular knowledge he studied on his own.  At age sixteen he became a Hebrew teacher in Kostopol (Kostopil) and later in Berdichev.  He was active in Zionist work primarily in the field of Hebrew education.  In 1904 he came to the United States.  For a time he was active in the Labor Zionist movement, later switching to Mizrachi.  In his youth he began writing Hebrew poetry.  He debuted in print with an essay following the Kishinev pogrom in Der fraynd (The friend) in St. Petersburg (1903).  In 1905 he published a series of letters from America in Der veg (The way) in Warsaw.  He was later among the first contributors to the Labor Zionist organ Der idisher kemfer (The Jewish fighter) in Philadelphia—aside from articles, he also published here a translation of Y. Ḥ. Brenner’s Arum a pintele (Around a point [original: Misaviv lenekuda]) over the period 1906-1907, as well as translations of Ḥ. N. Bialik, Aḥad-Haam, and others.  His work appeared in: Der id (The Jew), Dos idishe folk (The Jewish people), Idishes tageblat (Jewish daily newspaper), Varhayt (Truth), Morgn-zhurnal (Morning journal), and Der tog (The day), among others.  Over the years 1942-1949, he served as co-editor of Der mizrakhi-veg (The Mizrachi way) in New York.  His work in Hebrew appeared in: Haleom (The nation), Hayom (Today), Shevilim (Pathways), Hatoran (The duty officer), Miklat (Sanctuary), Eden (Eden), Noar (Youth), Shevile hainukh (Educational paths), Lua aiasef, Hadoar (The mail), Aviv (Spring), Ben hador (Son of the generation), Hainukh haivri (Hebrew education), and Hamore (The teacher)—he also edited the last four of these.  His books in Hebrew include: Hazeman harishon (The first time) (New York, 1912), 28 pp.; Im hador (With the generation) (New York, 1932), 285 pp.; Reshit, limud kriya velashon (First, study reading and language) (New York, 1947); and others.  In Yiddish: Vos iz yidishe ertsihung? (What is a Jewish education?) (New York, 1917), 16 pp.  He died in New York.  In his memory was published Sefer zikaron ley. z. frishberg (Memorial volume for Y. Z. Frishberg) (New York, 1958), 98 pp.

Sources: P. Vyernik, in Morgn-zhurnal (New York) (January 10, 1932); obituary notices in the Yiddish press (October 19, 1955); Yoysef Kohen, in Idisher kemfer (New York) (March 23, 1956); Daniel Perski, in Hadoar (New York) (Tevet 1 [= December 16], 1955); Y. N. Adler, in Shevile hainukh (New York) (Winter 1955/1956); M. Ginzburg, in Keneder odler (Montreal) (July 21, 1958); A. R. Malachi et al., in Sefer zikaron ley. z. frishberg (Memorial volume for Y. Z. Frishberg) (New York, 1958).
Khayim Leyb Fuks


DANIEL FRISH (FRISCH)


DANIEL FRISH (FRISCH) (September 21, 1897-March 7, 1950)
            He was born in the land of Israel.  For many years he lived in Romania.  In 1921 he moved to the United States, and there he became a Hebrew teacher.  He was active in the Zionist Organization.  He contributed work to: New Palestine and Dos yidishe folk (The Jewish people), among other Zionist publications.  He also authored the pamphlet Tsienistishe organizatsye in amerike (Zionist Organization in America) (Washington, 1944).  He was president of the American Zionist Organization.  In book form: Dos heymland, a rayze in erets-yisroel (The homeland, a voyage in the land of Israel) (New York, 1947), 32 pp.  He died in New York.

Source: H. Y. Alderman, in Jewish Book Annual (New York) (1951-1952), p. 47.
Benyomen Elis


AVROM FRISH


AVROM FRISH (1891-1943)
            He was born in Kolomaye, eastern Galicia.  He attended religious elementary school, graduated from a Polish high school, and later studied medicine at the University of Vienna.  He served in the Austrian army in WWI.  From 1920 he worked for various Jewish institutions in Kolomaye and served as director of the local Jewish hospital as well as being a leader of the legal Bund.  He contributed poetry to the Warsaw-based Folks-tsaytung (People’s newspaper) and other publications.  In book form: Libe, nisht mer (Love, nothing more) (Kolomaye: Bloyer shtrokh, 1938), 120 pp.  He also left in manuscript Yiddish translations of plays by Shakespeare and Goethe’s Faust.  During the Nazi occupation during the years of WWII, he remained active in the Kolomaye ghetto.  He was killed by the Germans.

Sources: Foroys (Warsaw) (August 5, 1938); “Yizker” (Remembrance), Yidishe shriftn (Lodz) (1946); Pinkes kolomaye (Records of Kolomaye) (New York, 1957), pp. 285-86.
Benyomen Elis


MENDL FRITS


MENDL FRITS
            He was a Soviet writer, who wrote stories for: Yungvald (Young forest), Pyoner (Pioneer), and Emes (Truth) in Moscow; and Shtern (Star) in Kharkov; among others.  In book form: Der zavod ruft, fartseykhenungen (The factory calls, jottings), “a story of modern times” (Moscow: Emes, 1934), 76 pp.  Since the show trials of 1937, he has disappeared without a trace.  Biographical details remain unknown.

Sources: N. Rubinshteyn, Dos yidishe bukh in sovetnfarband (The Yiddish book in the Soviet Union) (1934), see index; N. Mayzil, Dos yidishe shafn un der yidisher shrayber in sovetn-farband (Jewish creation and the Jewish writer in the Soviet Union) (New York, 1959), see index.
Khayim Leyb Fuks


ZAYNVIL FRIMKES


ZAYNVIL FRIMKES
            He came from Volhynia.  He lived in Vilna and later in London.  He was active in the Jewish anarchist movement.  He contributed to and proofread publications of R. Mazin.  He published sketches and humorous pieces in Arbayter fraynd (Workers’ friend) and in Mazin’s biweekly publication Der tsienist (The Zionist) in London (1903-1904), among others.  He authored: a novel in verse, which he later reworked into a drama entitled Di traye liebe, a roman der nayer tsayt (Devoted love, a novel of modern times), a comedy in four acts (Vilna, 1`891), 103 pp.; and Nokh tsien, bruder (After Zion, brother) (London: Mazin, 1904), 12 pp.  Further information unavailable.
Khayim Leyb Fuks