Friday, 18 January 2019

RUVN TSIPKIN


RUVN TSIPKIN
            He was the manager of the Vilna school “Mefitse Haskala” (Promotion of Enlightenment).  In 1941 he was confined in the Vilna ghetto, working at the local train depot.  With the liquidation of the Vilna ghetto, he reached Estonia.  His end is unknown.  In book form: Rekhnbukh (kheshbn un geometrye), farn finftn lernyor (Math textbook, arithmetic and geometry, for the fifth school year) (Vilna, 1936), 59 pp., vol. 2 (Vilns, 1938).

Source: Lerer yizker bukk (Remembrance volume for teacners) (New York, 1954), p. 355.
Leyb Vaserman


AVROM TSIPKIN


AVROM TSIPKIN (d. 1940s)
            During the Nazi occupation, he was confined in the Kovno ghetto and worked in a labor brigade.  According to Ber Mark, Tsipkin belonged to the Kovno writers.  A number of his poems may be found in Shmerke Katsherginski’s Lider fun di getos un lagern (Songs from the ghettos and camps) (New York, 1948), pp. 108, 183, 184, 185, 201, 308, 320, 321, 322, 323.  His poems concerned ghetto motifs.  He died in the 1940s.

Sources: Shmerke Katsherginski, Lider fun di getos un lagern (Songs from the ghettos and camps) (New York, 1948); Sh. Lastik, in Yidishe shriftn (Lodz) (April 1949); Lastik, Mitn ponem tsum morgn (Facing tomorrow) (Warsaw, 1952), p. 145; Dr. Sh. Grinhiyz, in Lite (Lithuania), vol. 1 (New York, 1951), p. 1756; B. Mark, Umgekumene shrayber fun di getos un lagern (Murdered writers from the ghettos and camps) (Warsaw, 1954).
Yankev Kahan


YISROEL-YITSKHOK TSIPERSHTEYN


YISROEL-YITSKHOK TSIPERSHTEYN
            He came from Proshke (Pruszków), near Warsaw.  In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, he lived in Warsaw and was known as the “wedding entertainer from Pruszków” (Proshker badkhn).  He authored various poems that appeared in those years, among them Dray naye lider (Three new poems) (Warsaw, 1889), 20 pp., second printing 1900.  In this work may be found his poem “Al tira avdi yankev” (Fear not, my servant Jacob), which was sung in Poland as a folksong.  Other biographical details remain unknown.
Khayim Leyb Fuks



MENAKHEM-MENDL TSIPIN


MENAKHEM-MENDL TSIPIN (July 11, 1874-November 30, 1925)
            He was born in Chernigov (Chernihiv), Ukraine.  He received a strict religious education, later studying in high school from which he was expelled over a strike.  In 1902 he had to leave the Russian empire, and he departed for the United States.  He worked in weaving, helped to organize a union, and chaired it for a time.  He began writing sketches for Fraye arbeter shtime (Free voice of labor) in New York; while still in Russia, he wrote Hebrew poetry and contributed to Russian-language newspapers and magazines.  He later published stories and sketches in Fraynd (Friend) and Dos lebn (The life).  For a short time, he worked with the newly founded Varhayt (Truth), before switching to the anarchist daily Di abend tsaytung (The evening newspaper).  In Philadelphia he co-edited an anarchist weekly entitled Broyt un frayhayt (Bread and freedom).  He became a contributor to Chicago’s Idisher kuryer (Jewish courier) and other serials.  In 1910 he became city editor for Idisher kuryer, later moving over to Miller’s newspaper Der fihrer (The leader) where he served as labor editor, until the paper folded.  He then became assistant editor of Fortshrit (Progress).  After the February (March) Revolution in 1917 he returned to Russia.  From Moscow he corresponded to Yudishes tageblat (Jewish daily newspaper), Tog (Day), Idishe velt (Jewish world) in Philadelphia, and Fortshrit, among others.  He came back to Philadelphia and wrote for Nation (in English), and Forverts (Forward), among others.  He was active in the Communist movement and wrote for Di frayhayt (The freedom).  In 1925 he again left for Russia.  He settled in Odessa and assumed an important position there.  He came back to New York a sick man and died a short time later.  He translated into Yiddish: Nikolai Lenin, A briv tsu di amerikaner arbeter (A letter to American workers [original: Pis’mo k amerikanskim rabochim] (New York: Avangard, 1919), 24 pp.; and Albert Williams, Di bolshevikes un di sovetn (The Bolsheviks and the soviets) (New York: Avangard, 1919), 48 pp.

Sources: Zalmen Reyzen, Leksikon, vol. 3; Kritikus, in Tsukunft (New York) (1904), p. 51; Moyshe Shtarkman, in Hadoar (New York) (May 23, 1947), p. 844; D. Shub, in Forverts (New York) (November 7, 1965).
Yankev Kahan


GETSL-YOYNE TSEKHANOVSKI


GETSL-YOYNE TSEKHANOVSKI (b. December 1, 1908)
            He was born in Lodz, Poland.  He attended religious elementary school, public school, and high school in Pyetrikov (Pyotrkow).  In his youth he was commercial traveler, later a laborer.  His first publications were jokes in Ekstrablat (Extra newspaper) in Lodz (1924).  He later published in: Ekspres-blat (Express newspaper), Unzer moment (Our moment), Di epokhe (The epoch), Literarishe bleter (Literary leaves), and Baderekh (On the road)—in Warsaw; Di post (The mail) in Cracow; Fraye arbeter shtime (Free voice of labor) in New York; and Nayvelt (New world) in Tel Aviv.  In 1923 he edited, and with Simkhe-Bunem Gliksman, published a weekly newspaper for literature, art, and community issues entitled Epokhe (Epoch) in Lodz.  In 1939 he made aliya to the land of Israel.  He was living in Ramat-Gan.
Yankev Kahan


H. TSISIN


H. TSISIN
            He lived and worked in Moscow.  From 1927 until the middle of the 1930s, he published poetry, stories, and reportage pieces in Kharkov’s Royte velt (Red world) and Moscow’s Emes (Truth) and In kamf (In the struggle).  D. Hofshteyn, A. Kushnirov, and Y. Nusinov helped introduce him into literature.  Further biographical details remain unknown.
Leyzer Ran


MENASHE TSINKIN


MENASHE TSINKIN (b. 1880)
            He came from Russia.  From 1910 he was living in the United States.  He was active in the Cloakmakers’ Union and the anarchist movement.  Until 1950 he worked in a sweatshop.  He was a regular contributor to: Gerekhtikeyt (Justice) (1922-1952), Der yunyon arbeter (The union laborer), Byalistoker shtime (Voice of Bialystok), Fraye arbeter shtime (Free voice of labor), and Forverts (Forward), among others, in New York.  He published stories and novellas about workers.  In book form: In shop un oysern shop (In the sweatshop and out of it), images and sketches of workers’ lives (New York, 1951), 219 pp.  In 1952 he left New York and was to have settled in Florida.

Sources: Biblyografishe yorbikher fun yivo (Bibliographic yearbooks from YIVO) (Warsaw, 1928), see index; Yoysef Kahan, Di yidishe anarkhistishe bavegung in amerike (The Jewish anarchist movement in the United States) (Philadelphia, 1945); Kahan, in Tsukunft (New York) (January 1952).
Khayim Leyb Fuks